KopeLion – Ngorongoro


The lion – a symbol of wild Africa - is threatened. Across much of Africa, lions are in dramatic decline. Now, even the world’s most iconic king of the beasts – the Ngorongoro lions – are in danger.

This is KopeLion

KopeLion strives to foster human-lion coexistence in Ngorongoro Conservation Area. Here intensifying human-wildlife conflicts has been tough on the lions. In the last decades, the lions have begun to disappear entirely from their former ranges, separating the famous Ngorongoro Crater lions from the Serengeti. The area’s mission for harmonious coexistence is collapsing, with both people and wildlife losing out. KopeLion was founded in 2011 with the aim to change this trend. By working directly with residents, KopeLion strives for sustainable human-lion coexistence in Ngorongoro for the benefit of both people and lions.

KopeLion, comprised of local experts and international scientists, employs former lion hunters to actively protect the remaining lions and reduce conflicts. Our work builds upon data collected over the last 50 years, representing the best-known, best-studied lions in the world. This offers the unique opportunity to measure the effects of our efforts on a population of lions, studied for generations.

Our Vision and Mission

Vision: Successful and locally driven human-lion coexistence in Ngorongoro.
Mission: Inspire and enable local action, using science and traditional knowledge, for managing and monitoring sustainable human-lion coexistence in a multi-use landscape.

How we do it

Protect lions: Our on-the-ground team prevents and stops lion killings.
Increase lion tolerance: We reduce conflicts by finding and retrieving lost livestock, help reinforce bomas, warn herders of lions’ presence, and offer wound treatment on injured livestock.
Study lions: We find lions and record observations for the long-term demography study. We recognize each lion and follow them throughout their lives. We study how they adapt to living among people, tracking their movements and activity, using GPS collars.
Engage with the communities: Our team are mainly locals. We provide employment, embracing traditional practices, working directly with the communities.
Study human-predator interactions: We survey where, when and why attacks on livestock happen and by what predator. Knowing livestock vulnerability to attack helps us design better mitigation strategies.
Combine and build skills: We maximise our impact and understanding of this human-lion interaction by combining modern techniques, science, and traditional ecological knowledge.
Share our knowledge: We compile, analyse and share our expanding knowledge in reports to authorities, peer reviewed publications, and public presentations.

Facebook Posts

Noldepesi (meaning in the bush) was recently found on the plains west of the Crater - an area with a long absence of lions and community prone to retaliatory actions. We nearly lost her in a hunt last week after she killed two donkeys - but the quick actions of the Ilchokuti team saved her from this fate. KopeLion returned three days later, with the warriors whod been determined to kill her, and collared Noldepesi. As with our other collared lions, we hope to better understand how she uses this high-conflict landscape and by knowing her position, better protect her from harm.Involving the community, and especially warriors, in these events is powerful and perspective-altering. Kayanda, our Ilchokuti, spent the following day tracking her movements and ensuring her safety - and was enthusiastically joined by the owner of the donkeys!#lionconservation #lion #lions #lioncollaring #humanlionconflict #humanwildlifeconflict #kopelion #ilchokuti #communityconservation

Kope Lion added 2 new photos.

Noldepesi (meaning 'in the bush') was recently found on the plains west of the Crater - an area with a long absence of lions and community prone to retaliatory actions. We nearly lost her in a hunt last week after she killed two donkeys - but the quick actions of the Ilchokuti team saved her from this fate. KopeLion returned three days later, with the warriors who'd been determined to kill her, and collared Noldepesi. As with our other collared lions, we hope to better understand how she uses this high-conflict landscape and by knowing her position, better protect her from harm.

Involving the community, and especially warriors, in these events is powerful and perspective-altering. Kayanda, our Ilchokuti, spent the following day tracking her movements and ensuring her safety - and was enthusiastically joined by the owner of the donkeys!

#lionconservation #lion #lions #lioncollaring #humanlionconflict #humanwildlifeconflict #kopelion #ilchokuti #communityconservation
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Good to hear she didn’t get killed. I luv these precious lions I watch them all the time.. I wish I could experience being around them. ❤️❤️

4 days ago   ·  3
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Community involvement and mutual respect is amazing and will go a long way

4 days ago   ·  2
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Good

4 days ago   ·  1
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Great work

3 days ago   ·  1
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Thanks to all of you!

3 days ago   ·  2
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Will the owner of the donkey's be compensated?

3 days ago   ·  1

2 Replies

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And the community of understanding grows...well done everyone!

3 days ago   ·  1
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That's a beautiful thing

3 days ago   ·  1
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Lion populations need to be protected & herders moved on - it’s the only way. Education & community involvement are great but we do not have the lion numbers to afford loosing any - harsh penalties & shoot to kill poachers will provide a good result

2 days ago
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Thinking of you...

2 days ago   ·  1
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Lion social life can be harsh, and a lions’ biggest enemy is often another lion. Since January this year we are frequently seeing 3-4 youngsters that look miserable; skinny, coats in bad shape, with many old and new puncture wounds. They are 1.8 and 2 years old, born in the Ngorongoro Crater’s Lakette pride. Since 2016 the Lakette were pushed out of their good territory by the Lagunita pride. Last time we saw a mom of the Lakette youngsters was in October 2017; a scraggly lioness well beaten up by other lions. These youngsters are thus left on their own, and any lion they encounter are likely to beat them up. They are still young, inexperienced hunters. We have observed them edging closer to the establishing Mungetati pride. Their resident male (MG91) is also the father of the Lakette youngsters – perhaps influencing Mungetati’s tolerance to having the youngsters nearby and scavenging from their kills. Importantly, what we are observing is the ongoing, natural dramas of lions’ social life. The lions face no other immediate stresses in the Crater; food is plenty and there is good security from other direct dangers. If these youngsters push through, they will become tough lions, ready to tackle a lion’s roller-coaster life of feast and famine, bliss and battles.

Kope Lion added 4 new photos.

Lion social life can be harsh, and a lions’ biggest enemy is often another lion. Since January this year we are frequently seeing 3-4 youngsters that look miserable; skinny, coats in bad shape, with many old and new puncture wounds. They are 1.8 and 2 years old, born in the Ngorongoro Crater’s Lakette pride. Since 2016 the Lakette were pushed out of their good territory by the Lagunita pride. Last time we saw a mom of the Lakette youngsters was in October 2017; a scraggly lioness well beaten up by other lions. These youngsters are thus left on their own, and any lion they encounter are likely to beat them up. They are still young, inexperienced hunters. We have observed them edging closer to the establishing Mungetati pride. Their resident male (MG91) is also the father of the Lakette youngsters – perhaps influencing Mungetati’s tolerance to having the youngsters nearby and scavenging from their kills. Importantly, what we are observing is the ongoing, natural dramas of lions’ social life. The lions face no other immediate stresses in the Crater; food is plenty and there is good security from other direct dangers. If these youngsters push through, they will become tough lions, ready to tackle a lion’s roller-coaster life of feast and famine, bliss and battles.
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:'( vu le déclin du nombre de lions en Afrique, vous devriez peut être les aider un peu pour qu'ils ne meurent pas de faim ..... même si c'est la loi de la nature :( nous l'avons tellement malmenée qu'un coup de pouce serait le bienvenu pour ces jeunes lions. Chaque vie étant tellement précieuse actuellement pour la survie de l'espèce !

2 weeks ago
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Jeremiah Kweka this is the best page you can follow for more about Lion life

2 weeks ago   ·  3
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Thank you Ingela for the clarification about this poor lions but its like we are going to loose them so soon because their conditions keeping get more worse so i don't know how we could help them

2 weeks ago   ·  1
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TOUGH LIFE MAKE TUFF KINGS

2 weeks ago   ·  1
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Philly Naman

2 weeks ago   ·  1
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Its a tough life, but they will hopefully only get stronger

2 weeks ago
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I hope they will survive~

2 weeks ago
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